Couples and Family Therapy Concentration

Concentration Overview

Couples and family therapy has been a rapidly growing field since its beginnings 50 years ago. Therapists, educators, clergy, and health care workers, among others, are becoming increasingly aware of the complexities of human interactions and are seeking new ways of conceptualizing and working with individuals, couples, and families. The concentration in couples and family therapy in the PsyD program at Springfield College prepares couples and family therapists to address the varied mental health needs of children, adults, and families, including those with severe mental illnesses. Students will learn theories and effective practices for working with children, adults, couples, and families across the lifespan and within a variety of settings. The couples and family therapy concentration is designed to prepare students to provide counseling for individual, couple, and family problems and issues in settings that include private practice, managed care, community and public mental health agencies, schools, colleges and universities, health care facilities, and other human service agencies.

Concentration Curriculum

In addition to the core, PsyD classes, students in the couples and family therapy concentration will take 18 credits of couples and family therapy specific courses including both core courses and electives.

Core Courses

  • PSYC 662 Marital Interactions
  • PSYC 627 Assessment in Family Therapy
  • PSYC 637 Intervention in Family Therapy
  • PSYC 647 Multisystem Collaboration for Family Therapist
  • PSYC 660 Introduction to Marriage and Familly Therapy
  • PSYC 664 Couples Therapy

Research Opportunities

Students in the program are encouraged to engage in research by pursuing their own personal research interests or collaborating on projects with faculty and other students. Additionally, all students will complete a sequence of research practicum courses that culminates with the completion of a dissertation. Students are eligible to receive funding from the Graduate Students Research Fund.